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Jones v. State

Supreme Court of Wyoming

November 22, 2016

ZECHARIAH JAY JONES, Appellant (Defendant),
v.
THE STATE OF WYOMING, Appellee (Plaintiff).

         Appeal from the District Court of Natrona County The Honorable Daniel L. Forgey, Judge

          Representing Appellant: Office of the State Public Defender: Diane Lozano, State Public Defender; Tina N. Olson, Chief Appellate Counsel; Eric M. Alden, Senior Assistant Public Defender. Argument by Mr. Alden.

          Representing Appellee: Peter K. Michael, Wyoming Attorney General; David L. Delicath, Deputy Attorney General; Christyne M. Martens, Senior Assistant Attorney General; Caitlin F. Young, Assistant Attorney General. Argument by Ms. Young.

          Before BURKE, C.J., and HILL, DAVIS, FOX, and KAUTZ, JJ.

          DAVIS, Justice.

         [¶1] Zechariah Jones was convicted and sentenced consecutively for attempted second-degree murder and aggravated assault and battery. On appeal he raises two constitutional questions relating to those sentences. We affirm.

         ISSUES

         [¶2] We restate the issues as follows:

1. Is cumulative punishment for attempted second-degree murder and aggravated assault and battery, as defined under Wyo. Stat. Ann. § 6-2-502(a)(ii), [1] barred by that aspect of the double jeopardy clauses of the state and federal constitutions which protects against multiple punishments for a single offense?
2. If those crimes share the same elements, does that fact render them unconstitutionally vague?

         FACTS

         [¶3] During the summer of 2014, Zachary Albrecht attempted to get his significant other[2] to spice up their love life by having sex with another man. Using her Facebook account, he contacted Jones and tried to persuade him to visit her when he was not home. Thereafter, the woman and Jones communicated regularly via Facebook, but she repeatedly told him she had no interest in a sexual liaison.

         [¶4] On August 24, 2014, Albrecht came home to find his significant other extremely upset and speaking with Jones on her cell phone. Jones told her Albrecht was pursuing a tryst with a woman who lived in another town, and sent her what he claimed were texts to that effect from the other woman. The two argued briefly about those accusations until Albrecht took the phone from her to confront Jones. Their conversation became heated, and Albrecht told Jones he would "kick his ass" if they ever ran into one another. Sometime after 4:00 p.m., Albrecht took his significant other's phone and drove off, leaving her at home with her children. The two men had agreed to meet at Riverview Park on the north side of Casper to fight.

         [¶5] At approximately 6:00, Jones arrived at the park in a blue Ford Taurus borrowed from a female friend. Albrecht also arrived and walked toward Jones, who by this time had exited his vehicle and stood by the door with his hands in his pockets. According to Albrecht and two witnesses who were nearby, the men exchanged words, Jones extended his arm toward Albrecht, and they heard a "pop" as Jones shot him in the upper left portion of the abdomen with a small 22 caliber semi-automatic pistol. Jones then drove off. The two witnesses did not see anyone with him in the blue Taurus.

         [¶6] Both witnesses called 911 and later gave a physical description of Jones, as well as the license plate number on the Taurus. Albrecht identified him by name. The male witness showed investigators where Jones had been standing when he fired the pistol, and they found a spent .22 shell casing nearby.

         [¶7] That evening, a surgeon discovered that the bullet had penetrated a portion of Albrecht's liver and stomach and lodged under the skin on the left side of his back. He was hospitalized for several days before being released, and he eventually had to return on September 10, 2014, for a second surgery to remove fluid accumulations, treat infections, and address other complications from the bullet's passage through his upper abdomen and lower chest.

         [¶8] Casper police apprehended Jones late in the afternoon of August 25, 2014, and the following day he was charged with attempted second-degree murder and aggravated assault and battery. The Information also charged that Jones had three prior felony convictions, and thus qualified as an habitual criminal under Wyo. Stat. Ann. § 6-10-201 as to both counts.[3] The weapon used in the shooting was never recovered.

         [¶9] Following a four-day trial in mid-April of 2015, a jury found Jones guilty of both charged crimes.[4] The district court sentenced him to a prison term of forty to fifty years for the attempted murder, and to a term of fifteen to fifty years for the aggravated assault and battery.[5] He timely perfected this appeal.

         DISCUSSION

         Double Jeopardy

         [¶10] Jones argues that sentencing him for both attempted murder and assault and battery violates the double jeopardy clauses of the state and federal constitutions, and in particular, the bar against punishing a defendant more than once for what, in effect, is a single offense set out in two statutes.[6] Whether the separate provisions describe the "same offense" is a question of legislative intent which ...


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