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RUHLIN ET AL. v. NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE CO.

decided: May 2, 1938.

RUHLIN ET AL
v.
NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE CO.



CERTIORARI TO THE CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE THIRD CIRCUIT.

Hughes, McReynolds, Brandeis, Butler, Stone, Roberts, Black, Reed; Cardozo took no part in the consideration or decision of this case.

Author: Reed

[ 304 U.S. Page 203]

 MR. JUSTICE REED delivered the opinion of the Court.

On February 14, 1935, the New York Life Insurance Company, respondent here, filed its bill of complaint in the District Court for Western Pennsylvania to rescind, because of certain misrepresentations, the disability and double indemnity provisions in five policies issued on the life of defendant John G. Ruhlin, and made in favor of the other defendants as beneficiaries.

The bill alleged that the plaintiff is a mutual life insurance company incorporated under the laws of the State of New York and lawfully engaged in business in Pittsburgh,

[ 304 U.S. Page 204]

     Pa.; that the defendants are temporarily living in Pennsylvania, though plaintiff does not know where their legal residence is; that on December 1, 1928, plaintiff wrote two policies of life insurance on the life of John G. Ruhlin, in the face amounts of $10,000 and $5,000; that on July 7, 1930, it wrote three additional, similar policies in the face amount of $4,000 each; that certain questions in the applications were answered falsely and fraudulently by the insured; that on November 1, 1934, John G. Ruhlin presented a claim for total and permanent disability benefits under each of the five policies. The Company tendered into court the sum of $1,045.42, the aggregate amount of premiums paid for disability and double indemnity benefits, and prayed that the disability and double indemnity provisions be rescinded, and for other relief not material here.

The defendants filed a motion to dismiss the complaint on the ground that the policies had become incontestable, since the suit was brought more than two years after the date of each policy involved. The "incontestability clause" of each of the policies reads as follows:

"Incontestability. -- This Policy shall be incontestable after two years from its date of issue except for nonpayment of premium and except as to provisions and conditions relating to Disability and Double Indemnity Benefits."

The District Court overruled the motion to dismiss. The Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the order, holding that, in view of their express terms, the incontestability clauses had no application to liability for disability and double indemnity benefits. It recognized that its decision was contrary to that reached by the Circuit Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, New York Life Ins. Co. v. Kaufman, 78 F.2d 398, and by the Circuit Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, New York Life Ins. Co. v. Truesdale, 79 F.2d 481, which had held that the exception in the

[ 304 U.S. Page 205]

     incontestability clause related only to provisions and conditions actually set forth in the policy itself, compare Stroehmann v. Mutual Life Ins. Co., 300 U.S. 435, and that fraud was not mentioned in any of those provisions. Ruhlin petitioned for certiorari, asserting the conflict of circuits. The Company filed a memorandum admitting the conflict, and raising no objection to the granting of the writ. Because of the conflict of circuits, the Court granted certiorari.

It was stated in Carpenter v. Providence Washington Ins. Co., 16 Pet. 495, 511, that questions concerning the proper construction of contracts of insurance are "questions of general commercial law," and that state decisions on the subject, though entitled to great respect, "cannot conclude the judgment of this court." A limitation was put on this doctrine in Mutual Life Ins. Co. v. Johnson, 293 U.S. 335, 340. Putting aside all questions of power, the Court interpreted a specific provision of an insurance contract in accordance with the decision of the highest court of the State of Virginia, where delivery was made. "All that is here for our decision is the meaning, the tacit implications, of a particular set of words, which, as experience has shown, may yield a different answer to this reader and to that one. With choice so 'balanced with doubt,' we accept as our guide the law declared by the state where the contract had its being." The decision in Erie R. Co. v. Tompkins, ante, p. 64, goes further, and settles the question of power. The subject is now to ...


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