Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

HELVERING v. UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD CO.

decided: December 3, 1934.

HELVERING, COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE
v.
UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD CO.



CERTIORARI TO THE CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE SECOND CIRCUIT.

Hughes, Van Devanter, McReynolds, Brandeis, Sutherland, Butler, Stone, Roberts, Cardozo

Author: Stone

[ 293 U.S. Page 282]

 MR. JUSTICE STONE delivered the opinion of the Court.

Prior to 1913 respondent, directly or through a subsidiary corporation, sold three issues of bonds, all maturing at dates subsequent to 1923. All were sold at a discount and petitioner paid or allowed to bankers an additional amount as commissions for marketing the bonds. The commissions and discounts, amortized over the periods

[ 293 U.S. Page 283]

     from the dates of issue to maturity of the bonds, exceeded $300,000 in each of its taxable years 1918 to 1923 inclusive. Respondent kept its books and made its tax returns on the accrual basis. Deduction from gross income, in its tax returns, of the amortized amount of the commissions and discount was disallowed by the Commissioner, who found a corresponding deficiency under the applicable Revenue Acts of 1918, c. 18, 40 Stat. 1057, and 1921, c. 136, 42 Stat. 227.

The Board of Tax Appeals ruled that the petitioner was entitled to the deduction for the discount but not commissions. 26 B. T. A. 1126. On the appeal of the taxpayer alone the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit reversed the Board, holding that the commissions should be treated in the same manner as the discount and that the deductions were rightly made. 69 F.2d 67. This Court granted certiorari on the petition of the Commissioner, which set up that the decision below conflicted with that of the Court of Appeals in the Seventh Circuit, in Chicago, R. I. & P. Ry. Co. v. Commissioner, 47 F.2d 990, see also Bonded Mortgage Co. v. Commissioner, 70 F.2d 341, and is inconsistent with the decision of this Court in Old Colony R. Co. v. Commissioner, 284 U.S. 552, which held that premiums received by the taxpayer upon the sale of its bonds before 1913 could not be subjected to income tax in later years by the expedient of prorating them over the period between the date of issue of the bonds and their maturity.

In support of the petition the Government contends that the commissions are not, as the court below held, losses incurred in the taxable year which are deductible under § 234 (a) (4) of the Revenue Acts of 1918 and 1921, although not to be realized until payment of the bonds at maturity. It insists instead that the commissions are expenses incurred and paid at the date of the

[ 293 U.S. Page 284]

     bond issue which cannot, on any theory, be deducted in later years. Further, it contends that the amortization of the commissions paid before 1913 and their deduction as amortized in tax returns in later years is inconsistent with the decision of this Court in Old Colony R. Co. v. Commissioner, supra.

1. There is no provision in either the 1918 or 1921 Revenue Acts specifically authorizing the deduction from gross income of commissions or discount paid or allowed by the taxpayer upon an issue of bonds. Section 234 of the 1918 and 1921 Acts, like the corresponding provisions of the Acts before and since, allow deduction of expenses paid or incurred, interest paid or accrued, and losses sustained during the taxable year. Sections 212 (b) and 213 (a) of the 1918 and 1921 Acts, like § 13 (d) of the 1916 Act, c. 463, 39 Stat. 756, 771, authorize the taxpayer to make his income tax returns on the accrual basis where his books are kept on that basis and reflect true income; they require it if he fails or is unable to make his return on a cash receipts and disbursements basis. The taxpayer is thus enabled to charge against income of the taxable period expenses incurred in and properly attributable to the process of earning income during that period, although payable in a later one. See United States v. Anderson, 269 U.S. 422, 440; Aluminum Castings Co. v. Routzhan, 282 U.S. 92; Niles Bement Pond Co. v. United States, 281 U.S. 357. It follows that when the return is made on the accrual basis, expenses or obligations incurred by the taxpayer in connection with a bond issue, which are not discharged until the payment of the bonds at maturity, may properly be accrued or amortized over the period of the life of the bonds and allowed as annual deductions from gross income.

By Article 150, Treasury Regulations 33, as revised, relating to the 1916 Revenue Act, both commissions and discount upon bond ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.