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ADVANCE-RUMELY THRESHER CO. v. JACKSON

decided: December 5, 1932.

ADVANCE-RUMELY THRESHER CO., INC
v.
JACKSON



APPEAL FROM THE SUPREME COURT OF NORTH DAKOTA.

Hughes, Van Devanter, McReynolds, Brandeis, Sutherland, Butler, Stone, Roberts, Cardozo

Author: Butler

[ 287 U.S. Page 286]

 MR. JUSTICE BUTLER delivered the opinion of the Court.

By this appeal we are called on to decide whether as construed below a statute of North Dakota, c. 238, Laws

[ 287 U.S. Page 2871919]

     , is repugnant to the due process or equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. It declares:

"Sec. 1. Reasonable Time to Discover Defects. Any person, firm or corporation purchasing any gas or oil burning tractor, gas or steam engine, harvesting or threshing machinery for their own use shall have a reasonable time after delivery for the inspection and testing of the same, and if it does not prove to be reasonably fit for the purpose for which it was purchased the purchaser may rescind the sale by giving notice within a reasonable time after delivery to the parties from whom any such machinery was purchased, or the agent who negotiated the sale or made delivery of such personal property or his successor, and placing same at the disposal of the seller.

"Sec. 2. Provisions Contrary to Preceding Section Void. Any provision in any written order or contract of sale, or other contract which is contrary to any of the provisions of this Act is hereby declared to be against public policy and void."

The complaint of appellee, plaintiff below, shows the following facts. August 13, 1928, defendant, in consideration of $1,360 to be paid by plaintiff according to his three promissory notes given therefor, sold and delivered to the latter a harvester-combine to be used for the cutting and threshing in a single operation of grain raised by him. Plaintiff undertook by means of the machine so to cut and thresh his crop, but upon a fair trial and test he found that it was defective and could not be used or made fit to operate for the purpose. September 5, he rescinded the sale in the manner prescribed by the statute. His notes remained wholly unpaid. He prayed judgment that defendant return them to him for cancellation. The answer, asserting that the statute is repugnant to the due process and equal protection clauses, does not deny the complaint but avers that plaintiff gave defendant a written order by which he waived all warranties, express,

[ 287 U.S. Page 288]

     implied or statutory, and unconditionally promised to pay the price represented by the notes. Plaintiff demurred. The trial court sustained the demurrer and, defendant having elected to stand on its answer, gave plaintiff judgment in accordance with the prayer of the complaint. The supreme court affirmed. 62 N. D. 143; 241 N. W. 722.

On the facts alleged in the complaint, § 15 (1) of the Uniform Sales Act, Laws 1917, c. 202, implied a warranty by defendant that the machine was reasonably fit in a single operation to cut and thresh plaintiff's grain. Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. v. Frank, 57 N. D. 295, 299; 221 N. W. 75. But it left plaintiff free to waive such warranty and to purchase on the terms referred to in the answer. § 71. Minneapolis Threshing Mach. Co. v. Hocking, 54 N. D. 559, 569; 209 N. W. 996.

The question is whether the challenged enactment of 1919 may prohibit such waivers as contrary to public policy and void, and so limit the right of seller and purchaser to contract. While that right is a part of the liberty protected by the due process clause, it is subject to such restraints as the State in the exertion of its police power reasonably may put upon it. But freedom of contract is the general rule and restraint the exception. The exercise of legislative authority to abridge it can be justified only by the existence of exceptional circumstances. Adkins v. Children's Hospital, 261 U.S. 525, 545, 546 and cases cited. In determining the validity of a legislative declaration that a contract is contrary to public policy, regard is to be had to the general rule that competent persons shall have the utmost liberty of contracting and that it is only where enforcement conflicts with dominant public ...


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