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EDWARD B. ST. JOHN, CLAIMANT OF THE STEAMBOAT NEPTUNE, APPELLANT, v. ZEBULON A. PAINE

December 1, 1850

EDWARD B. ST. JOHN, CLAIMANT OF THE STEAMBOAT NEPTUNE, APPELLANT,
v.
ZEBULON A. PAINE, SARAH NORWOOD, JOHN BUCKNAM, ANDREW BRADFORD, AND AUGUSTUS NORTON, LIBELLANTS.



THIS was an appeal from the Circuit Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York. The circumstances of the case will be best explained by inserting the libel and answer, which were as follows: 'To the Honorable Samuel R. Betts, Judge of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York. 'The libel and complaint of Zebulon A. Paine of Eastport, in the state of Maine, owner of one half part of the schooner Iole, and owner of part of the cargo lately shipped on board thereof; Sarah Norwood of Eastport, in the state of Maine, aforesaid, owner of the other half part of the said schooner; John Bucknam, owner of part of the cargo lately shipped on board thereof; Andrew Bradford, owner of part of the cargo also lately shipped on board thereof; Joseph Sumner, master of the said schooner; James McCollar, mate thereof; Ambrose Tucker, James Woorster, seamen, and Henry Cuff, cook, all of said schooner; and Augustus Norton of Eastport, a passenger on board of the said schooner, against the steamboat Neptune, all parties intervening for their interest in the same, in a cause of civil and maritime jurisdiction. 'And thereupon the libellants allege and propound respectively upon and according to their respective best knowledge, information, and belief, as follows:–– '1st. That the said schooner Iole, belonging and owned in Eastport, aforesaid, whereof the said Joseph Sumner was master, on or about the 7th of July, 1846, set sail and departed from the port of Eastport, in the state of Maine, aforesaid, with the said Joseph Sumner as master, having on board of said schooner a cargo consisting of laths, pickets, plaster, fish in barrels, thirty empty barrels, and two barrels of beer, and two packages of money, bound for the port of New York; and that the said schooner was then tight, stanch, and strong, and well manned, tackled, apparelled, and appointed, and was, in every respect, fit for the voyage the so undertook. '2d. That in the evening of the 14th day of July, aforesaid, the said schooner, with three passengers, and with the said cargo on board, had successfully proceeded in and upon her said voyage past and about one mile to the south of the light-boat stationed off the Middle Ground, a shoal nearly opposite to Stratford Point, and that the said schooner passed the light-boat, being about one mile to the southward thereof. 'That the said schooner was then steering about a west course, the wind being nearly from the north; that the night was clear, and the said vessel could be easily discerned at a considerable distance; that whilst sailing upon her course, about west, with a fresh wind, going at from six to eight knots per hour, and a short time after the said schooner had passed the said light-boat, and between the hours of nine and ten o'clock at night, on the high seas, and within the admiralty and maritime jurisdiction of this court, she was negligently run against and into, by the said steamboat Neptune, which steamboat eas then and there proceeding down the Sound from the city of New York; and the said steamboat then and there run and struck against the hull of the said schooner, between the fore and main rigging, on her larboard side, with such great force and violence as to break and tear open the hull of the said schooner, and cut her nearly in two, so that she filled and sunk almost immediately; and the said vessel and her cargo, and the clothes, money, and personal effects of the crew and passengers were totally lost; and two of the passengers, viz., a female named Murphy, and her child, were drowned. '3d. That the crew of said schooner and one of the passengers, viz ., the libellant Augustus Norton, saved their lives by jumping from the said schooner on to the deck of the said steamboat; that they made inquiries for the captain of the said steamboat, but could find no captain on board; that they asked those on board of said steamboat to despatch a boat with assistance, to endeavor to save the lives of the woman and child aforesaid; but that, no assistance being offered or given, two of the crew of the said schooner, with two of the passengers of the steamboat, took the small boat of the said steamboat, and went in search of the said female and child, but that their efforts were unavailing, the said schooner having sunk, and the said female and child having disappeared. '4th. That the said steamboat was at the time aforesaid carelessly, improperly, and unskilfully navigated, and that the loss of the said schooner, with the cargo on board thereof, and the clothes, money, and effects of the crew and passengers, and the lives of the said female and child, was occasioned solely by the fault, carelessness, and unskilful management of the said steamboat. That the crew, and those having the control and management of the said steamboat, as your libellants are informed and believe, were inexperienced in the command of the said steamboat, and were incompetent, unskilful, and insufficient, or else were careless and negligent, and by their want of skill, or carelessness and negligence, occasioned the said disaster, without the fault of the said schooner and her crew. That Long Island Sound, where the disaster occurred, is very wide, and there was ample room for the said steamboat to have passed and avoided that said schooner without any difficulty whatever. '5th. That the said schooner or vessel, called the Iole, her tackle, apparel, and furniture, at the time of the said collision, was of the value of three thousand dollars of thereabouts, and was owned and possessed as follows; that is to say, the libellant Zebulon A. Paine was the owner of one equal half part thereof, and the libellant, Sarah Norwood was the owner of the other half part thereof. '6th. That the libellant Zebulon A. Paine was at the time of the said collision the owner of two hundred thousand laths, 4900 pickets, and 1725 § pickets, thirty-five tons of plaster, and thirty-nine barrels of fish, shipped by him on board of the said schooner upon the said voyage, which were of the value of five hundred and fifty dollars, or thereabouts, and which cargo so shipped by him was totally lost by the said collision. '7th. That the libellant John Bucknam was at the time of the said collision the owner of thirty-six barrels of pickled fish, which he had shipped at Eastport aforesaid, on board of the said schooner, and which was totally lost by the said collision, and which last-mentioned cargo was of the value of one hundred and seventeen dollars or thereabouts. '8th. That the libellant Andrew Bradford was at the time of the said collision owner of thirty empty beer-barrels, and two barrels containing beer, which he had shipped on board of the said schooner at Eastport aforesaid, to be carried to New York, and which last-mentioned cargo was totally lost by the said collision. '9th. That the libellants Zebulon A. Paine and Sarah Norwood have also lost, in consequence of the said collision, the freight and passage money which the said schooner would have earned upon the delivery of said cargo in New York, and have been deprived of the use and employment of the said schooner, and have been interrupted in their business and mercantile pursuits, to their great loss and damage. '10th. That the libellant Joseph Sumner saith, that he was the owner of, and had on board of the said schooner at the time of the collision aforesaid, and totally lost, the articles, property, and effects enumerated and specified in the schedule hereto annexed, marked A, which he prays may be taken as a part thereof; which articles, property, and effects are truly valued in the said schedule. 'That the libellant James McCollar saith, that he had on board, and was the owner of, at the time of the said collision, and totally lost, the articles, property, and effects specified in schedule B, hereto annexed, and which he prays may be taken as a part of this libel, and that the value of said several articles is truly set forth therein. That the libellant Ambrose Tucker saith, that he was the owner of, and had on board of the said schooner at the time aforesaid, and totally lost, the property and effects specified, and being of the value stated, in schedule C, hereto annexed, and which he prays may be taken as a part of this libel. That the libellant James Woorster saith, that he was at the time of the said collision the owner of, and had on board the said schooner, and totally lost by the said collision, the property and effects specified and being of the value stated in the schedule hereto annexed, marked D, and which he prays may be taken as a part of this libel. That the libellant Henry Cuff said, that he was the owner of, and had on board of the said schooner at the time of the collision aforesaid, and totally lost, the articles mentioned in the schedule hereto annexed, marked E, being of the value therein stated, and which schedule he prays may be taken as a part of this libel. That the libellants Joseph Sumner, James McCollar, Ambrose Tucker, James Woorster, and Henry Cuff, were sailing in and on board of the said schooner, on monthly wages, and that they have been thrown out of employ and put to much expense and loss. 'That the libellant Augustus Norton saith, that he was a passenger on board of said schooner, and that he was the owner of, and had on board at the time of the said collision, the property and effects specified in schedule F, hereto annexed, and which he prays may be taken as a part of this libel; and that the said property and effects are truly valued in the said schedule, and they were wholly lost to him, and that in consequence he is now destitute, having saved nothing but one shirt, and that he has suffered great inconvenience, anxiety, and delay by reason of the said loss. '11th. That after information of the loss of the said schooner and her cargo, as aforesaid, was received in New York, the libellants' agents in said city caused application to be made to George Law, who, as they are informed and believe, was at the time of the said collision the owner of the said steamboat, to pay the damages which the steamboat had improperly, carelessly, and negligently occasioned as aforesaid, but that he refused to comply with such request. '12th. That all and singular the matters aforesaid are true, and within the admiralty and maritime jurisdiction of this honorable court, and that the said vessel, here tackle, apparel, &c., is within the district, and in verification thereof, if denied, the libellants crave leave to refer to the depositions and other proofs to be by them exhibited in this cause.

The opinion of the court was delivered by: 'Wherefore the libellants pray, thay process in due form of law, according to the course and practice of courts of admiralty, and of this honorable court in causes of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction, may issue against the said steamboat Neptune, her tackle, apparel, and furniture, and that all persons having or pretending to have any right, title, or interest therein may be cited to appear and answer upon oath all and singular the premises. And that this honorable court will be pleased to pronounce for the damages aforesaid, and to decree such other relief to the libellants as shall to law and justice appertain.

'Also to condemn the said steamboat, her tackle, apparel, and furniture, and all persons intervening for their interest therein, in costs and expenses.

'JOSEPH SUMNER,

E. H. OWEN.'

After a stipulation had been entered into for costs by the libellants, a monition and attachment were issued, under which the marshal attached the vessel; a stipulation being entered into on behalf of the vessel in the sum of five thousand dollars, she was discharged.

In September, 1846, the following answer was filed:–– 'To the Honorable Samuel R. Betts, Judge of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York.

'And now Edward B. St. John, of the city of New York, in the district aforesaid, intervening for his interest in the steamboat Neptune, appears before the honorable court, and for answer to the libel and complaint of Zebulon A. Paine of Eastport, in the state of Maine, Sarah Norwood of same place, and John Bucknam, Andrew Bradford, Joseph Sumner, James McCollar, Ambrose Tucker, James Woorster, Henry Cuff, Augustus Norton, against the steamboat Neptune, and all parties intervening for their interest in the same, propounds as follows:––

'1st. That the respondent, at the time in the said libel set forth, to wit, on the 14th day of July aforesaid, and before and afterwards, was the lawful owner of the said steamboat Neptune, a vessel of 720 tons, or thereabouts, now in the service of the United States, and having sailed for Texas or Mexico.

'2d. And the respondent, as to the allegations of the said libellants, and each of them, in the first, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, and tenth articles of the said libel contained, says that he is ignorant of and not informed concerning the same save by the said libel, and cannot therefore admit or deny the same to be true, but leaves the same to be proved according to the custom and practice of this court. And the said respondent further alleges and propounds, that the matters in the second, third, and fourth articles of the said libel are in great part falsely alleged, and that the truth is, as this respondent is informed and believes, as is hereinafter particularly propounded.

'3d. That the said steamboat Neptune, being in good order and well and sufficiently equipped and manned, sailed from the port of New York, in the state of New York, at five o'clock in the afternoon of the 14th day of July, 1846, bound for Newport and Providence, in the state of Rhode Island; and, in prosecution of her voyage, proceeded on her passage, at her regular rate, until about one mile from Stratford light-boat, when, at or about eight or ten o'clock in the evening, a vessel was seen about half a quarter of a mile ahead, which vessel the respondent understood to have been the schooner Iole, as is alleged in said libel.

'4th. That, immediately on seeing the said schooner Iole, the course of the said Steamboat Neptune was changed to windward of the said schooner, for the purpose of giving said schooner the course she was then running. That when the said steamboat was about ten or twelve lengths from the said schooner, it was observed that the latter had changed her course, and was luffing up so as to cross the bows of the said steamboat. That, when first seen, said schooner was running west by south, from which she changed suddenly to about northwest. That, on seeing that said schooner had changed her course, the bell of the steamboat was immediately rung to stop her, and all efforts made to avoid the collision; but the said schooner came directly across the bows of the said steamboat, and, the latter having some headway, a collision could not be avoided. That the said schooner was struck about midships, and her crew at once jumped from the rigging on board the said steamboat. That the first report was, that no one was left on board the schooner; the next was, that a female and child were left on board, upon hearing which a small boat was immediately lowered from the Neptune, and sufficiently manned, and every other possible effort was made for the purpose of saving the persons on board of the said schooner; but that, before or about the time the boat could be lowered, the said schooner disappeared; but whether any person or persons were in her at the time she sunk, this respondent is not informed, save by the said libel, and cannot state. That the captain of the said steamboat, and the men with him who manned the said small boat, continued to row about the place of the disappearance of the said schooner for more than half an hour; but, finding no person or persons needing their aid, they returned to the Neptune. That, at the urgent request of the said passengers on board the said steamboat, who feared she might have become leaky by the collision, the said boat returned to New York; and, on being examined, was found to be in safe condition, only injured a little at the bows, and fully able to have continued her voyage in safety.

'5th. That Thomas J. Davis was, at the time of the occurrence aforesaid, master and captain of said steamboat, and had been on board of her for a year or more preceding; and that Nathan Child, former captain of said boat, a pilot accustomed to conduct and manage steamboats in the harbor of New York and on the route said boat was then proceeding, and John Driver, a wheelsman familiar and experienced in the management of said boat, and who had been employed on board of her the preceding seven years, were in the pilot-house, at the wheel, at the time of the said occurrence; and that all and every of said persons were skilful and sufficient in the management of said boat, and were in no way, nor were the crew employed in said boat, inexperienced, incompetent, unskilful, insufficient, careless, or negligent in the management of said steamboat, as is falsely alleged in the fourth article of the libel aforesaid; nor was the said steamboat, at the said time carelessly, improperly, or unskilfully navigated; nor was the loss of the said schooner and cargo and other effects in the said libel named, nor the lives of the said woman and child, if any such loss took place, occasioned by the fault, carelessness, or unskilful management of the steamboat, as is also falsely alleged in the said fourth article of the said libel aforesaid.

'6th. That the reason why the said schooner was not seen earlier than at the distance of one quarter of a mile was, that a heavy black cloud shut her out from view, and she had no lights visible on board which could enable the captain, or pilot, or the other wheelsman, or any of the crew of the said steamboat, to discover the said schooner sooner.

'7th. That, as soon as the said schooner was seen, the course of the said steamboat was immediately changed, according to the rule customary in such cases, so as to give the schooner the course she was pursuing. That this threw the broadside of the Neptune to view from the schooner, so that the man at the wheel on board the schooner saw the head and stern lights of the steamboat more distinctly, and her course was plainly seen by him.

'8th. That the wind was blowing fresh, and the luffing up of the schooner so as to cross the bows of the steamboat, when the position and course of the latter were so evidence to those on board the schooner, could not have been expected by any person on board the steamboat, and was contrary to all proper and lawful rules of navigation.

'9th. That the said captain, pilot, wheelsman, and crew of the said steamboat Neptune used the greatest skill and care in the management of the same on the night aforesaid, and took every possible precaution to prevent the occurrence of any accident; and that the said steamboat did not in any manner negligently run against the said schooner, as is falsely alleged in the second article of the said libel.

'10th. That, on the occurrence of the said accident, the captain of the said steamboat, with a sufficient number of his crew, manned the small boat, and went in her, so as to afford every possible assistance to the persons or property on board the said schooner; and the allegations in the third article of the said libel, that no captain could be found on board of said steamboat, and that no assistance was offered or given to save the lives of those on board of the said schooner, are false.

'11th. That the accident aforesaid was occasioned by the great negligence and want of care of the officers and crew of the schooner Iole, in not providing powerful lights on deck so that the said schooner could be discerned at a distance, and in changing the course of said schooner right across the bows of the said steamboat when the latter was in full view of the said officers and crew, and that it it was not occasioned by the fault, carelessness, or unskilful management, or by any malice of evil design on the part of the said captain, pilot, or any of the crew on board the said steamboat Neptune, as is falsely alleged in the fourth article of said libel, and that the owner of the said steamboat Neptune is not therefore liable to pay the damages by the libellant sustained.

'12th. That as to the allegations in the said tenth article of said libel contained, this respondent says, that some person or persons on behalf or in the name of the libellants, or one of them, informed the said Law of the occurrence and accident, and stated who was the counsel employed therein; that said Law immediately called on said counsel of libellants, and on behalf of the owner of said steamboat offered to leave the whole matter to the decision of any two disinterested persons, who might choose a third as umpire; that said counsel of libellants promised to see his clients, and acquaint said Law with their answer to said proposition; that the only reply or answer made was the sending of an officer of this court to take possession of said boat by virtue of the said libel in this cause.

'13th. That all and singular the premises are true; in verification whereof, if denied, the respondent craves leave to refer to the deposition and other proofs by him exhibited in this cause.

'Wherefore, the respondent prays that this honorable court would please to pronounce against the libel aforesaid, and to condemn the libellants in costs, and otherwise right and justice to administer in the premises.

'E. B. ST. JOHN, Respondent.

'WOODRUFF & GOODMAN, Proctors.'

To this answer the libellants filed a general replication.

At December term, 1846, the libel was amended, by leave of the court, by striking out the names of Joseph Sumner, master, James McCollar, mate, Andrew Tucker and James Woorster, seamen, and Henry Cuff, cook, wherever the same occur as parties to the suit.

Much testimony was taken on both sides, of which it is impossible to make an abstract; but the evidence of the master of the Iole and of the pilot of the Neptune will show the representations of the respective parties.

The following is the evidence of the master of the Iole.

'Joseph Sumner, sworn. Objected to by claimant as incompetent; master of bring Olive, trading between Eastport and New York; sixteen years mariner; five or six years master of vessel; been fifteen to twenty times through Sound.

'Master of Iole, 14th July last; his watch below at eight, P. M.; went below half past eight; night was clear, starlight; could see across the Sound both sides; did not observe any heavy clouds in any part of horizon; first notice of danger was, mate came to companion-way and called out that a steamboat was coming into them; when he went below, wind was north; steered west, at rate of seven knots; ordered them to keep west; that course would have taken them to Captain's Island, or near that, off Sawpits, making allowance for half a point variation of compass; kept up so high in order to be at windward, if wind hauled westward, which had appearance of doing; when called, got to gangway as quick as could do so; first looked ahead and saw schooner was heading up the Sound by land on northern side; looked astern, and saw Stratford Point and light-boat, latter about two points on starboard quarter, that would make course of schooner about west; when asked where steamboat was; received no answer; then looked under main boom, and saw steamboat coming head on to his broadside; she was bearing about south of him, as he judged from Old Field Point light, which was about two points on starboard quarter of steamboat; steamboat appeared fifteen to thirty feet from him, but cannot judge distances accurately at night; her wheels were then going. Could at time see the land very plain on Long Island side; struck almost immediately, about midships; schooner then had about three points of sheet off, and sails were full when he came on deck; that must have been about a west course of schooner; steamer struck to leeward; was dead to leeward of schooner when he saw her; cut in twelve feet with bow, and within four feet of through the schooner; bow pressed through the galley and stove it to pieces; she remained fastened in to schooner a minute or two; witness made to bows of steamer as soon as could, called for a rope from her, received none, and got hold of bolt-rope of schooner, and got up part way on bows of steamboat, and then thought of woman passenger on board, and got down on lumber to try to save the woman; found he could get no footing, as lumber was afloat, the schooner having sunk under it; then climbed again by rope of sail to bows of steamer; as soon as he got on bows, asked for captain of steamer; two or three voices repeated there was no captain on board; same as to mate.

'Witness then went aft to find small boat; searched four or five minutes for it, and when he found it, she was lowered, and two of schooner's men and two others in her; it was shoving off as he got there; went to search for passengers, Mrs. Murphy and child.

'Witness then returned to bow of steamer, and saw small boat row up to where schooner sunk; saw no more of her till her return.

'Did not hear bell of steamboat ring to stop her. Schooner was in good order; about eighty tons; had cargo on board. (Proves bill of lading of part; deposition to this fact to put in.) The sky continued clear; saw several vessels both sides of schooner, one ahead and one to leeward; before collision, one to leeward was bearing about southeast; should judge could see vessels, before and after collision, two miles in all directions; never saw vessels carry lights in Sound such a night.

'If steamer had been running her true course when he came on deck, would have cleared schooner, for she was dead to leeward; spoke with some one on board the steamer; don't know who; heard no one called captain; was told there was none on board. Witness talked with John Driver (defendant objects, and ruled out); had conversation with Harris after arrival at New York; he said he had turned in at time of collision; did not explain cause of accident.

'Witness never said or admitted to Childs or Harris that he ought to have carried lights, or that accident was owing to his not doing so.

'Brought the woman and child from Eastport; child about three years old; knew her in Eastport; was a very short time getting from his berth to deck; did not call for woman and child, because his whole mind was on saving his vessel, and did not think of them; after got on deck, had not time to think of woman and child; thought of his own life and to save schooner; thinks tide was about slack and low water.'

The evidence of the pilot of the steamboat was as follows:––

'Defence.–Captain Nathan Childs, sworn. Resides at Providence; is forty-seven years old; mariner thirty-five years, in all capacities,–principally on the Sound, on all kinds of craft; been about twenty years pilot or master of steamboats.

'Was on board Neptune, 14th July, 1846, as pilot. Left New York about five, P. M. Captain Henry Harris was also pilot on board. Thomas Davis was Captain of the boat, and she had her full complement of men, as he believes; was not on board the trip before. Witness had watch fore part of the night. Weather was clear, except black cloud at east. Between nine and ten the cloud was about two hours high, or at height of sun at two hours above horizon, and closed down to horizon, and spread northeast and southeast. Neptune was running east by north. Witness stood in front part of wheel-house, midships, on the look-out. Driver had the wheel. Witness was at middle window of wheel-house, about the middle of the boat. Wheelsman was under his directions. Could then see ahead from one fourth to three eighths of a mile, so as to discern an object; should not think could see any thing, except a light, farther off. Neptune was going at about ten miles the hour. About twenty-five minutes before ten, first saw schooner (Iole), north; was then about one mile and a half from light-boat, Stratford shore light bearing east by north one half north. Schooner was then directly ahead; could just discern her by side of flagpole. Wind was about north; quite a strong breeze. Could not tell what course of schooner was; could not see her plain enough. She was trimmed close aft, or nearly so; might have had her sheets a little eased off, that brought her sails edgewise towards him, and could not tell whether she was a sloop or schooner.

'Witness ordered the wheel hove hard a-starboard immediately; and in less than half a minute ordered bell rung to stop the engine, seeing we were coming very near; and then rang the back engine, and by that time were close to schooner, and soon struck.

'The effect of heaving wheel a-starboard was to bring boat up to northward, and altered course of boat to about northeast.

'Thinks schooner was heading about northwest. She was square across bow of Neptune when they came together. Schooner had no lights; customary for sailing vessels on Sound to show lights when steamboats are near. Thinks schooner could have easily fallen off with the wind, if she saw the steamboat. If she had altered her course a very trifle, by falling off at any time within a mile, she could have easily cleared the Neptune. As soon as struck, crew of schooner got on board Neptune. Boat of Neptune was immediately lowered, and sent out to see if could find any body. It returned without finding any person; and captain took it himself, with lantern, and went out again, and was out with it about twenty-five minutes. Came back without finding any person. She was then hoisted up, and Neptune started, first northward, and directly across the Sound; from collision three quarters to one hour Neptune lay by before going on; found Neptune leaking some; and, after consultation, it was thought more prudent to return to New York. Got back to New York at half-past three to four, A. M.

'Schooner ought to have set a light or altered her course. Pretty much all vessels set a light, in dark nights, when steamboats are near. It is impossible to see sail-vessels any distance such nights without.

'Neptune had two large, bright lights, which could easily have been seen four or five miles off.

'If schooner had altered her course half a point within fifteen or twenty minutes of collision, would easily have avoided it.

'Schooner could very easily have gone to leeward, not so easily to windward, of Neptune.

'Witness changed his course to about northeast to windward, and considered that the prudent and safe course to take; changed it only to escape schooner.

'According to his experience in meeting sail-vessels in that way, it is the proper course for steamer to go to windward of steamer.

'Thinks there were from two hundred to two hundred and fifty passengers on board the Neptune; not a great many ladies.

'Collision was caused by schooner not setting a light, and not altering her course when she saw the Neptune.

'Not aware of any thing that could have been done on Neptune that was omitted to avoid the collision, according to his judgment and experience; and every thing was atterwards done in their power to save life and property on schooner. Schooner sunk in about eight minutes after collision.

'Houghton (clerk of boat) and Davis (a passenger) were in wheel-house at the time, with witness and man at wheel. Witness first discovered schooner. Captain Davis had turned in, at back part of wheel-house, twenty or twenty-five minutes before collision. Masters usually retire after boat gets well into the Sound.

'Witness had sailed the boat before that as master, but came on board that day as pilot; was appointed by Mr. Law. No time was specified nor wages. Witness was at that time employed on board Massachusetts, and it was understood that both boats belonged to same concern. Witness was transferred to the Neptune. Both boats had been running to same places. Does not know that they had been in opposition. Does not know that Harris, second pilot, had been on this boat before. He was also transferred from Massachusetts. Thinks that was Captain Davis's first trip at that period. Captain Rollins had been master before; understood that he and his pilots had been transferred to the Oregon that day; thinks it was about first of flood when he left New York, but does not recollect about it. Did not notice that particularly. Light-boat about fifty-five miles from New York. Thinks collision was a mile or a mile and a half from light-boat.

'A drunken man fell into dock fifteen or twenty minutes before leaving New York, and was drowned.

'Did not know or hear on board that the Neptune leaked when she left New York.

'Sound eight or nine miles wide at place of collision. Thinks the Neptune was a very little nearest south side of Sound, and on usual course he has been in the habit of taking on board steamboats. Judges his position from what had observed days going through the Sound. Did not at time see the shores. Thinks discerned Connecticut shore, but not plainly. No recollection of looking at Long Island side. Connecticut shore about five miles off; could see it plainest above.

'Could see light-boat, probably three or four miles off, and Stratford light about five miles. When he first saw schooner, she bore east by north from the Neptune, directly ahead. Could not tell how she was steering, or whehter going up or down the Sound. Did not look at her with his night-glass; had no time; his whole attention was directed to attempting to clear her; and took what he thought proper measure, by throwing wheel starboard. Judged she was going up or down the Sound, and that was the precaution always taken to clear them; probably one hundred to one hundred and fifty yards off when discovered how she was heading, but could not tell distance with any certainty. Put his wheel hard a-starboard, and thinks that altered his course four to four and a half points, and got his wheel so before saw how schooner was heading. As wind was, judged she must be going up or down the Sound; and besides, if running across Sound, sails would have shown differently. Steamer struck stem on, supposes starboard side of her stem, as that was more indented than the other.

'Thinks schooner would be running six or seven miles per hour. Hit her on larboard side, nearly between her two masts.

'Should judge schooner was heading about northwest when they struck. Her boom was not thrown off much. She would lie up to about northwest on that wind; and struck her nearly midships, about at right angles.

'Can't say what would have been the effect if he had not altered his course, vessels were so near to each other.

'If schooner had not altered her course, steamer would have cleared her. Saw schooner alter her course a minute or a minute and a half before striking. Presumes she was previously heading west, or within half a point of that.

'Discovered she was going up the Sound two or three minutes after he saw her; not over three or four minutes, he should think, from time he saw her till they struck. If he had thrown his wheel larboard, should have escaped her; but that would have been contrary to usage of passing vessels.

'If the schooner had kept her course just as she was struck, the steamer would probably have cleared her, if she had not altered her own course; and thinks would have cleared her fifteen feet.

'Thinks rang bell to stop in one minute after saw how schooner was, perhaps one hundred to one hundred and fifty yards off; rang bell to back as soon as he supposed engineer had time to stop. Knew by motion of boat that engine had stopped. Can always tell in wheel-house whether engine is in motion. ...


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